Why Far-Flung Parts of the Internet Broke Today

VolumeDrive is a Pennsylvania-based hosting company that uses Cogent and (since late May of this year) Atrato for Internet transit. A routing leak this morning by VolumeDrive was passed on to the global Internet by Atrato causing disruptions to traffic in places as far-flung from the USA as Pakistan and Bulgaria. Background The way Internet […]

Sprint, Windstream: Latest ISPs to hijack foreign networks

Last year my colleague Jim Cowie broke a story about routing hijacks that resulted in Internet traffic being redirected through Iceland and Belarus. Unfortunately, little has changed since then and the phenomenon of BGP route hijacking continues unabated and on an almost daily basis. In the past three days, the situation has gone from bad […]

No turning back: Russia activates Crimean cable

The Crimean peninsula depends critically on the Ukrainian mainland for infrastructure services: power, water, and Internet. That has begun to change in the last few days, as Crimean ISPs began receiving their first Internet services over the newly constructed Kerch Strait Cable, linking Crimea with the Russian mainland. The message: there is no turning back […]

Kurdish ISPs enable growth of Iraqi Internet

The recent violence in Iraq and the government’s actions to block social media and other Internet services have put a spotlight on the Iraqi Internet. However, an overlooked but important dynamic in understanding the current Iraqi Internet is the central role Kurdish ISPs play in connecting the entire country to the global Internet. In the […]

Amid raging violence, Iraq orders Internet shutdowns

Update (10:00ET, 14-Jun-2014): See below for a copy of Friday’s Iraqi MoC order to disconnect social media. Iraq is descending into further violence, as militant group ISIL takes control of Mosul and beyond. Renesys has observed two large Internet outages this week (here and here) that our sources confirmed to be government-directed outages. These interruptions […]

Beware the Ides of March: Subsea Cable Cut Trend Continues

Earlier this month, the International Cable Protection Committee, a submarine cable advisory group, held their annual plenary in Dubai. One question that they could have considered is: Why do so many submarine cables get cut in the February/March timeframe? In this blog, we’ll look back at the last three years and the submarine cable industry’s […]

Telenor activates historic link in Myanmar

Three years after the government opened up the country to the outside world, the telecommunications sector of Myanmar recently reached a tremendous milestone in its development. On March 8th, Telenor of Norway established Myanmar’s first independent international Internet connection. The last “green field” of telecom Prior to a few weeks ago, all international Internet access […]

Protests Lead to Outage in Thailand

Tensions in Thailand are high as a week of anti-government protests have turned violent and continue unabated. However, in an apparent reversal of a common theme with anti-government protests in recent years, multiple news sources have reported that protestors temporarily cut off a large portion of Internet service to their country. For example, The New […]

Google DNS Departs Brazil Ahead of New Law

Update (4:20PM, 22 Nov 2013): In response to recent NSA spying allegations, Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws. The proposed legislation could be signed into law as early as the […]

Submarine Cables Add Resilience But Paths Still Matter

Last month, I had the honor of opening the second day of the Submarine Networks World 2013 conference at the Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. Using a handful of recent examples, I demonstrated that, while new submarine cables certainly contribute to physical diversity and hence increased Internet resiliency, cables alone do not necessarily reduce traffic […]

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