Cuban Internet Update

On Tuesday, Fidel Castro turned 87 years old and an article this week about his birthday states that he surfs the Internet from Cuba for “personality profiles and maps” among other things. But at US$4.50/hour, the Internet is still out of reach for average Cubans, despite recent developments that have brought another provider to the island. Internet in Cuba It […]

Myanmar Internet Disruptions

Before Egypt became the country known for shutting off its international Internet during anti-government protests in January 2011, it was Myanmar that was known for infamously shutting down its Internet connections for two weeks following anti-government protests which turned violent in September 2007.During those protests, as the government began cracking down on anti-government demonstrations, protestors began […]

Hurricane Sandy: Outage Animation

Renesys continues to analyze the impacts on Internet connectivity from Hurricane Sandy. Here’s another quick view of the impact on the routing table as Sandy came ashore Monday night. Each square represents the fate of a set of networks geolocated within a common tenth-degree square of the Earth’s surface — at these latitudes, that’s about […]

Blast in Turkey Impacts Iran, Iraq

Last night, a pipeline carrying Iranian natural gas to Turkey was damaged by an explosion, halting gas flow, and perhaps surprisingly to some, disrupting Internet connectivity to northern Iran and Iraq. The Turkish government has accused the Kurdistan Workers party (PKK) militant group, who have claimed responsibility for pipeline explosions in the past, of perpetrating the attack.

Internet communications lines are often installed along existing physical routes, such as highways, power lines, rail lines or oil and gas pipelines. Since someone has gone to the trouble of establishing a right of way and clearing a path over hundreds of kilometers, the telecommunications folks often take the opportunity to lay fiber optic cable along the route, if at all possible.

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Orange Jordan Goes Black

At 10:28 UTC today, Jordanian incumbent, Orange Jordan (AS 8697), suffered a wide-spread Internet outage, lasting 2 hours and 16 minutes. Orange dropped service to 241 of the 244 networks it typically routes, temporarily erasing nearly 60% of Jordanian cyberspace.

The impact of the outage extended beyond the incumbent’s borders to Orange Jordan’s sole customer in Iraq, EarthLink (AS 50710). This provider lost service to 11 of its networks or 6% of its total, namely, those transiting Orange to reach the global Internet.

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Syria Briefly Disconnects

For about 40 minutes today, all networks routed through the Syrian incumbent, Syrian Telecommunications Establishment (AS29256 and AS29386), were withdrawn from the global routing table, effectively cutting off most of Syria from the Internet.

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Lebanon Loses Lone Link

Prior to the recent activation of Internet service to Lebanon via the IMEWE submarine cable, Internet service in Lebanon was labeled the “world’s slowest” due to its dependence on a combination of antiquated submarine cables built in the mid-1990′s and high-latency satellite service. However, as high-speed Internet service via IMEWE expanded in recent months, today’s outage reveals Lebanon’s new dependence on this lone modern connection to the outside world.

For almost three hours today, Lebanon experienced a near complete nationwide Internet outage. Between 16:13 and 18:59 UTC, we observed as many as 842 of the approximately 900 routed prefixes in Lebanon withdrawn from the global routing table, as illustrated in the graphic on the right. During this period of time, we saw almost every routed prefix downstream of incumbent Liban (AS42020) withdrawn. At 17:45 UTC, we saw these networks restored only to be withdrawn once again minutes later.

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The Pirate Bay Still Afloat

The_Pirate_Bay_logo.png The popular torrent site The Pirate Bay (TPB) suffered a widespread outage today as reported by several media outlets: BBC, TorrentFreak, PC Magazine, ZDNet, The Huffington Post and many others.

To understand why The Pirate Bay disappeared, we’ll look at them from a routing perspective, noting that without widely accepted routes to their IP space, they will lack global connectivity. TPB operates an autonomous system, AS 51040, which has two Internet service providers, namely, ROBTEX (AS 48285) and Serious Tubes Networks (AS 50066). TPB also has several peers, the most prominent of which is Hurricane Electric (AS 6939). To provide their services, The Pirate Bay originates two IP networks or prefixes: 194.14.56.0/24 (Pirate Networks) and 194.71.107.0/24 (The Pirate Bay). The 194.14.56.0/24 prefix appears to be TPB’s core network, while 194.71.107.0/24 appears to host TPB’s main domains, such as piratebay.net, piratebay.org, thepiratebay.com etc.

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TEAMS Cable Down Again

Only 35 days after a repair ship fixed the TEAMS (The East African Marine System) submarine cable, this cable was cut again this morning, wiping out a large chunk of international Internet connectivity in East Africa. At 9:04 UTC on 26 April 2012, we observed significant outage spikes in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Rwanda. Nearly half of all routed networks in Kenya and Uganda are unavailable at the time of this writing.

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Return of SMW3

The new EPEG terrestrial cable through Russia and Iran cannot come fast enough for Oman. Last month, three major submarine cables were severed by a ship’s anchor in the shallow waters of the Red Sea, including SEA-ME-WE 3 (SMW3). epeg.jpg

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